Nourish News

Here you will find up to date information on studio happenings, schedule changes and more.

  • Go With the Flow. Once we are rooted in our foundation, we move up to the sacral chakra. The second chakra is all about relationships and creativity. It’s element is water and it is associated with the color orange. The energy of this chakra allows you to let go, to move, and to feel change and transformation occurring within your body. It allows you to experience this moment as it is, in its own fullness. Mantras to support this are “I am open to experiencing the present moment through my senses”, “I feel pleasure and abundance with every breath I take” or “I am at peace”. Today, invite fluidity to all areas of your life. Dance around your kitchen. Be flexible as plans change. Allow yourself to truly BE, ...
  • Stand Firm. The 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln, said “Be sure you put your feet in the right place, then stand firm.” I love this quote and the ways in which it supports a yogic philosophy. It demands that we be certain that we are acting from a place of authenticity and Truth. In order to ascertain this, we must study ourselves, analyzing what prompts our actions and our perspective. Are we caught up in ego or attachment, unable to see “right action”? Are we clinging to old ways of thinking out of fear of the unknown? Taking a little time to assess our foundation, the root chakra, might support us this journey. The root chakra is located at the base of ...
  • Let’s Practice! In the Sutras Verse 1:14, it says ” Practice becomes firmly grounded when well attended to for a long time, without break and in all earnestness”. I share this with you for a couple of reasons. The first being that it encourages you to stick with your Yoga practice. It assures you that it will take time to arrive at a state of equanimity. It also encourages you to come to your practice with “full attention, with the entire application of your mind, and with full faith in your achievement.” In other words, it instructs you to commit yourself to your intention. Guided by these ethical principles, the Yamas and Niyamas, allow Yoga (union) to take root in your life. Today. I invite you ...
  • Let It Go. The fifth niyama is Ishvara Pranidhana  or surrender. This invites us to let go of our burdens. It is the dedication, devotion, and surrender of the fruits of one’s practice to a higher power. This Niyama speaks to two common aspects of yoga: the devotion to something greater than the self and the selfless action of karma yoga. Patanjali tells us that to reach the goal of yoga we must dissolve our ego and let go of our constant identification with ourselves. To do this, our yoga practice becomes an offering to something greater than ourselves. Through this simple act of dedication we become reminded of our connection to our higher power, and our yoga practice becomes sacred and filled with grace, inner ...
  • Svadhyaya The fourth niyama is svadhyaya or self-study. It helps us to see our true nature without judgement. This is accomplished through the contemplation of our life’s lessons and through the meditation on the truths revealed. Life presents an endless opportunity to learn about ourselves; our flaws and weaknesses give us the opportunity to grow and our mistakes allow us to learn. We begin to develop a “witness” mentality where we can see ourselves at any given moment and see beyond it to connect with something greater. Today, let’s cultivate our “witness”! Tune in and observe with out judgement what you are doing, what you are feeling, what is your state of mind. Do this several times throughout the day. Notice any patterns. Yours In Yoga, Lanta
  • What do you choose? We have spent the last five days contemplating the yamas or self-restraints. Now, we move on to the second limb, called the niyamas which include virtuous habits, behaviors and observances. Like the Yamas, there are five niyamas. Today, we will look at the the first one, Saucha meaning purity or clearness of mind, speech and body. I can appreciate how this can appear lofty, but lets simplify it a little bit. Saucha is an opportunity to “clean up your act” and there are so many ways to do it! You can observe your habits and refine those that don’t serve your highest good. You can create a more orderly environment which allows you more space for reflection. You can begin to be more mindful about what you eat and drink and listen to what your ...
  • Light Your Fire! The third niyamas is tapas or effort/discipline. It is translated as “to generate light or heat”. It inspires a practice of self-discipline to cultivate our will power. Like all of the yamas and niyamas, the application for tapas is endless. We can use this will power to draw us back to our intention again and again. It can fuel the fire which keeps us constant in our Practice. This same fire transforms and purifies us as we become more mindful of our impulses and negative behavior and choose to create change for ourselves. Today, I invite you to engage your inner fire with this simple Breath of Fire exercise. Close your eyes, place your hand over the area slightly above your belly button. Picture yourself filled with confidence and vitality. You will be inhaling and exhaling ...
  • By contentment, supreme joy is gained.  The second niyama is Samtosha or contentment, Samtosha is neither liking or disliking, but being ok with what is. The yogis tell us that when we are perfectly content with all that life gives us, then we attain true joy and happiness. It is so easy for the mind to be fooled into thinking that we can attain lasting happiness through the possession of objects and goods, but we know through our study of Yoga that the happiness gained through materialism is only temporary. Practicing contentment frees us from the unnecessary suffering of always wanting things to be different, and instead fills us with gratitude and joy for all of life’s blessings. Throughout the day, I invite you to stop and notice what you are experiencing. ...
  • Aparigraha. Say that 5 times fast! LOL! Seriously, aparigraha is translated as non-greed or non-hoarding. This is the fifth and final yama. It asks you to observe what you are holding on to. What do you cling to? Beliefs? Material goods? It is not instructing you to rid yourself of your belongings, but to release your attachments to them. And in getting rid of these attachments, we’re able to see clearly what it is that we truly need, and so get rid of anything that we don’t need, the stuff that just weighs us down. Today, I invite you to lighten your load. What can you let go? Feel free to share with me on my Facebook page or email me at lanta@nourish.works. I would love to know ...
  • Moderation in all things…even Moderation. The fourth Yama is bramacharya or moderation. The word Brahmacharya actually translates as ‘behaviour which leads to Brahman’. Brahman is thought of as ‘the creator’ in Yogic terms, so what we’re basically talking about is behaviour which leads us towards ‘the divine’ or ‘higher power’. Since it’s Saturday and I have throw a lot of information at you this week, I am going to simply invite you to direct your energy away from external desires and instead, towards finding peace and happiness within yourself. Take time today to be outdoors breathing fresh air or taking a delicious afternoon nap. Engage in self-care. Be contemplative and give your body what it needs. Think about where you direct your energy. Happy day! Lanta